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Red Wine May Check Prostate Cancer (October 16, 2002)

Good news for men who like red wine: researchers from Getafe University in Madrid have isolated five different polyphenols in red wine that inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. In laboratory experiments, prostate cancer cells in a test tube "committed suicide" by a natural process called apoptosis.

After lung cancer, prostate cancer is the second most deadly form of cancer for men, according to the American Cancer Society.

The Spanish study examined the effect of five polyphenols found in red wine – gallic acid, tannic acid, morin, quercetin and rutin – on prostate cancer cells. While the findings are based on a small study, the results are encouraging enough to expand the research to investigate the effects of these polyphenols in humans with the ultimate goal of using them to prevent the disease.

If these findings are confirmed by a larger study, they could explain why North Americans and non-Mediterranean European populations have a higher incidence of prostate cancer. The use of red wine and the consumption of other polyphenolic foods in Mediterranean countries may be the reason.

"The Mediterranean diet is considered to be protective against endocrine cancers (including prostate cancer)," said Dr. I. Romero, who headed the Spanish study. "And it features a low animal-fat and meat content, with a high intake of fresh fruit, vegetables, pasta and wine."

 

 

 

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