BECOME A MEMBER

Thousands of wines at your fingertips

Search database of wine reviews
Read about wines BEFORE they hit the stores
Match wines with foods

FREE MEMBERSHIP



GET TONY'S NEW EBOOK


TONY'S NOVELS
A gift for the literate wine-lover in your life – who may be you. Tony's murder mystery novels, set in the world of wine, are now available at a discount – autographed.

Find out more...

TUNE IN TO TONY
Listen to Tony

Listen to Tony talk about wine on 680 NEWS radio on Fridays at 10:48 am, on Saturdays at 2:48 am and 9:48 am, and on Sundays at 12:48 am and 1:48 pm.
Tony Aspler
Wine Reviews
Food & Wine Match
Personal Wine Cellar
Pocket Wine Cellar
Articles
Gourmet Recipes
Cocktails
Wine Primer
Links
More Tony Aspler
Tony's Books Tony's Books
Ontario Wine Awards
About Us About Us
Contact
Advertise

MEMBER LOGIN
E-mail Address or
Username
Password
 
Forget Password?
 

FREE MEMBERSHIP

POPULAR ARTICLES
All about sparkling wine Port wine 101 Pairing food and wine Pairing wine and cheese What wine to serve with chocolate Why we like to visit wine country A wine tour of Italy Germany and German wines Wine touring France: Cognac and Bordeaux Wine touring France: Burgundy A tour of California wine country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 TONY'S BLOG

More Tony's Blog  

The Science of Healthy Drinking (May 20, 2004)

book review
by Dean Tudor

The Science of Healthy Drinking (Wine Appreciation Guild, 2003, 461 pages, ISBN 1-891267-47-7, $39.95) is by Gene Ford, a wine journalist who specializes in medical writing about the benefits of alcohol and wine consumption. To quote, "This book represents a new effort at resolving a very old problem – inordinate fear of drinking."

To begin at the beginning: The American Medical Association passed a resolution on June 6, 1917, which included "alcohol as a beverage is detrimental to the human economy, and... its use... as a stimulant or as a food has no scientific basis." In part this led to the American Prohibition amendment. Ford has been writing about moderation for two decades. The basics of what he says (and what most people say) is that alcohol in regular small doses is good for the body, but in episodic, large doses it is life threatening.

The Greeks had a phrase applicable to many things: "nothing in excess." The major problems with alcohol have always been that it can be addictive, that it can cause allergic reactions, and that people don't know where to stop. The easiest solution has been forced abstinence. But then this infringes the rights of the knowing drinker who can control the substance. Ford advocates a compromise between the wets and the drys in society. He says responsible drinking is good for you, and that treatment is needed for abusive drinkers.

Here we also get into economics of medical expenses. The book's blurb reads, "In this book, Ford appeals to doctors and parents to evaluate the data and to intervene in the public health and medical system, which discourage all drinking in efforts to curb abuse." Before publication, this book was sent out for review to medical, academic, and industry authorities, whom I would assume to always be "on board" when it comes to alcohol consumption. So the publisher gathered a lot of praise from the already converted. It is always the religious and public health (government) authorities who clamp down on alcohol. These are the people who need to read and comment on the book...

The bulk of the tome is devoted to credible findings of health benefits in responsible consumption for 30 common health conditions (including angina, blood clots, high blood pressure, heart attacks, strokes, cancer, Alzheimer's, diet, gallstones, kidney stones, and osteoporosis). Some of these statistical and medical studies clearly show that moderate alcohol consumption saves society in annual medical costs compared to not drinking. Ford proposes one solution of communication, to get the results out to the media for a wider audience.

Some interesting and useful facts: the index features authors and publications so that researchers can check book sources and scientific references.
What I don't like about this book: not much on alcohol abuse. Also, Ford doesn't really come to grips with the communications issue, not delving deeply into why the word has not been spread.
What I do like about this book: along with extensive quotes and sources, there is a ton of material in the bibliography.
Quality/Price Ratio: 92.

 

 

 

More Tony's Blog  
 
ALL MATERIAL © TONY ASPLER   WEBSITE BY MEDIRESOURCE INC.
PRIVACY POLICY