BECOME A MEMBER

Thousands of wines at your fingertips

Search database of wine reviews
Read about wines BEFORE they hit the stores
Match wines with foods

FREE MEMBERSHIP



GET TONY'S NEW EBOOK


TONY'S NOVELS
A gift for the literate wine-lover in your life – who may be you. Tony's murder mystery novels, set in the world of wine, are now available at a discount – autographed.

Find out more...

TUNE IN TO TONY
Listen to Tony

Listen to Tony talk about wine on 680 NEWS radio on Fridays at 10:48 am, on Saturdays at 2:48 am and 9:48 am, and on Sundays at 12:48 am and 1:48 pm.
Tony Aspler
Wine Reviews
Food & Wine Match
Personal Wine Cellar
Pocket Wine Cellar
Articles
Gourmet Recipes
Cocktails
Wine Primer
Links
More Tony Aspler
Tony's Books Tony's Books
Ontario Wine Awards
About Us About Us
Contact
Advertise

MEMBER LOGIN
E-mail Address or
Username
Password
 
Forget Password?
 

FREE MEMBERSHIP

POPULAR ARTICLES
All about sparkling wine Port wine 101 Pairing food and wine Pairing wine and cheese What wine to serve with chocolate Why we like to visit wine country A wine tour of Italy Germany and German wines Wine touring France: Cognac and Bordeaux Wine touring France: Burgundy A tour of California wine country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 TONY'S BLOG

More Tony's Blog  

Domus Vinorum Hungarorum
by Michael Botner
 (June 30, 2004)

 
Signpost, House of Hungarian Wines (Domus Vinorum Hungarorum)  

Wine shops are a common presence in post-communist Budapest. On one occasion, during a stay at Hotel Taverna, in the heart of an upscale pedestrian quarter of Pest, on the left bank of the Danube, I discovered Présház winestore, almost next door. While visiting the underground, vaulted store, I stumbled on a tasting by one of Villany's most prominent winemakers, Attila Gere, and tasted his deeply impressive, Bordeaux-styled 2000 Kopár.

Unlike most wine shops in Budapest, which offer a focused selection of regions and winemakers, The House of Hungarian Wines gives a wider, more comprehensive overview of Hungary's wine scene. Located in the historic castle district of Buda, opposite the prestigious Hilton Budapest, the wine house is in the cellar of a neo-gothic style building. "It used to be a coal cellar," said the director of The House of Hungarian Wines, István Nyikos, "making this the ideal place for a wine cellar."

 
  Istvan Nyikos, Director, Hungarian House of Wine

More than any other such facility I have visited, it is designed much like a user-friendly museum or library, as though on a guided tour of Hungary's 22 wine regions. For each region, there is a station along the wine route, a journey as educational as it is entertaining. Each offers detailed wall maps and posters with key information, colourfully and clearly presented, displays of wines, and the opportunity to taste three or four wines from that specific region. "There is a set charge to take the tour and taste any of the 75 wines on display, about 10 per cent of our entire portfolio of 750 wines," said Nyikos. "For an extra charge, you can taste specialty wines like the complex, concentrated 1997 Tokaji Aszú 6 puttonyos from István Szepsy."

Apart from tastings and sales of wine to the public, the enterprise serves as a meeting place for wine professionals, offers wine courses at every level and organizes events and festivals, at home and abroad, for the public and groups of professionals. The wine house is the brainchild of Nyikos, who has been involved in Hungary's performing arts community as an economic director, event organizer and impresario for many years.

 
The author may be contacted at michael@accountingfortaste.ca.

 

 

 

More Tony's Blog  
 
ALL MATERIAL © TONY ASPLER   WEBSITE BY MEDIRESOURCE INC.
PRIVACY POLICY