BECOME A MEMBER

Thousands of wines at your fingertips

Search database of wine reviews
Read about wines BEFORE they hit the stores
Match wines with foods

FREE MEMBERSHIP



GET TONY'S NEW EBOOK


TONY'S NOVELS
A gift for the literate wine-lover in your life – who may be you. Tony's murder mystery novels, set in the world of wine, are now available at a discount – autographed.

Find out more...

TUNE IN TO TONY
Listen to Tony

Listen to Tony talk about wine on 680 NEWS radio on Fridays at 10:48 am, on Saturdays at 2:48 am and 9:48 am, and on Sundays at 12:48 am and 1:48 pm.
Tony Aspler
Wine Reviews
Food & Wine Match
Personal Wine Cellar
Pocket Wine Cellar
Articles
Gourmet Recipes
Cocktails
Wine Primer
Links
More Tony Aspler
Tony's Books Tony's Books
Ontario Wine Awards
About Us About Us
Contact
Advertise

MEMBER LOGIN
E-mail Address or
Username
Password
 
Forget Password?
 

FREE MEMBERSHIP

POPULAR ARTICLES
All about sparkling wine Port wine 101 Pairing food and wine Pairing wine and cheese What wine to serve with chocolate Why we like to visit wine country A wine tour of Italy Germany and German wines Wine touring France: Cognac and Bordeaux Wine touring France: Burgundy A tour of California wine country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 TONY'S BLOG

More Tony's Blog  

Ontario's Short-fall Harvest  (September 29, 2005)

For the Ontario wine industry it is the best of times and the worst of times. The 2005 harvest, thanks to the hottest, driest growing season on record, has produced the best fruit the wineries have ever seen. But because of the horrendously cold winter and early spring that preceded it, killing off buds and splitting vines, the quantities are down drastically. A usual Ontario harvest will produce an average of 50,000 tonnes of grapes. This year the growers are lucky if that figure will reach 20,000 tonnes.

According to the Wine Council of Ontario, the crop shortfall will result in the loss of $100 million to the province's 100 wineries. To maintain their shelf space on Liquor Control Board of Ontario shelves, the wineries will be allowed to blend up to 99 per cent of off-shore wines with locally-grown wines and label them "Cellared in Ontario." The current legislation for "Cellared in Ontario" wines allows the wineries to blend up to 70 per cent imported wines. This will not affect Ontario wines that bear the VQA seal (Vintners Quality Alliance, Canada's appellation system) which must be made from 100 per cent of grapes grown in designated viticultural areas.

I'm concerned that these blended wines will end up on the same LCBO shelves as VQA wines and confuse consumers who do not read back labels carefully. So scrutinize the labels, and if you want to buy Ontario wines, reach for bottles that carry the VQA seal.

 

 

 

More Tony's Blog  
 
ALL MATERIAL © TONY ASPLER   WEBSITE BY MEDIRESOURCE INC.
PRIVACY POLICY